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    TIPS FOR A MOUTH-HEALTHY HALLOWEEN | TATE FAMILY DENTISTRY BLOG

    Last updated 9 months ago

    Halloween is here, which for most children means bags of free candy and easy access to all kinds of sweets. It's also a pretty tempting holiday for adults. Here are 5 ways everyone can stay mouth healthy during Halloween and every day.

    Stay away from things that stick.

    Besides how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in tooth decay. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay. The stickier candies, like taffy and gummy bears, also take longer to get washed away by saliva.

    Chew gum that has the ADA seal.

    Instead of candy, consider gum. Studies show that chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after meals helps reduce tooth decay, because increased saliva flow helps wash out food and neutralize the acid produced by dental plaque bacteria.

    Avoid beverages with added sugar.

    When teeth come in frequent contact with beverages that contain sugar, the risk of tooth decay is increased. Drinking optimally fluoridated water can help prevent tooth decay. If you choose bottled water, look for kinds that are fluoridated.

    Think twice before picking hard candies.

    Besides how often you snack, the length of time sugary food is in your mouth plays a role in developing cavities. Unless it is a sugar-free product, candies that stay in the mouth for a long period of time subject teeth to an increased risk for tooth decay.

    Try and eat candy with meals.

    We know candy can be hard to resist, especially after all that hard work trick or treating for it! If you can, try and eat Halloween candy and other sugary foods with meals or shortly after mealtime. That's because saliva production increases during meals and helps cancel out acids produced by bacteria in your mouth and helps rinse away food particles.

    By making wise choices, you can still enjoy those Halloween goodies while keeping your mouth healthy for  a lifetime!

    AVERY LIKES TATE FAMILY DENTISTRY

    Last updated 9 months ago

    Miss Avery (the daughter of our dental assistant, Kristy) made a visit to the office today.  She decided that Tate Family Dentistry is such a great place, she will come here for dental checkups.....once she has teeth.

    BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT | TATE FAMILY DENTISTRY BLOG

    Last updated 9 months ago

    Congratulations to our Clinical Assistant, Erica and her husband, Jose on the birth of their son, Di'angelo Jax.  Di'angelo was born October 9, 2014 weighing 6 lbs 4 oz. The proud big brothers are Eriq, Giovanni and Joey.  

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY | TATE FAMILY DENTISTRY BLOG

    Last updated 9 months ago

    Happy birthday, to Dr Tate and Dr Tyler.  We have had a fun week celebrating the birthdays of both doctors.   We pray you are both blessed in this coming year!

    TMJ PAIN | TATE FAMILY DENTISTRY BLOG

    Last updated 10 months ago

    The temporomandibular joints, called TMJ, are the joints and jaw muscles that make it possible to open and close your mouth. Located on each side of the head, your TMJ work together when you chew, speak or swallow and include muscles and ligaments as well as the jaw bone. They also control the lower jaw (mandible) as it moves forward, backward and side to side.

    Each TMJ has a disc between the ball and socket. The disc cushions the load while enabling the jaw to open widely and rotate or glide. Any problem that prevents this complex system of muscles, ligaments, discs and bones from working properly may result in a painful TMJ disorder.

    Possible causes of TMJ disorders include:

    • arthritis
    • dislocation
    • injury
    • tooth and jaw alignment
    • stress and teeth grinding

    Diagnosis is an important step before treatment. Part of the dental examination includes checking the joints and muscles for tenderness, clicking, popping or difficulty moving. Depending on the diagnosis, the doctors may refer you to a physician.

    There are several treatments for TMJ disorders. This step-by-step plan from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research allows you to try simple treatment before moving on to more involved treatment. The NIDCR also recommends a “less is often best” approach in treating TMJ disorders, which includes: 

    • eating softer foods
    • avoiding chewing gum and biting your nails
    • modifying the pain with heat packs
    • practicing relaxation techniques to control jaw tension, such as meditation or biofeedback.

    If necessary for your symptoms, the following treatments may be advised:

    • exercises to strengthen your jaw muscles
    • medications prescribed by your dentist; for example, muscle relaxants, analgesics, anti-anxiety drugs or anti-inflammatory medications
    • a night guard or bite plate to decrease clenching or grinding of teeth.

    If you are experiencing facial pain, call our office today to schedule an evaluation.  Dr. John Michael Tate and Dr. Tyler Tate will be happy to assess your condition and make treatment recommendations. 

     



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All content and information are of an unofficial nature and are not intended to be interpreted as dental advice.
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